Spurgeon is a BIG Fish

Posted: July 11, 2007 in Spurgeon, Theology

Not quite as often as I would like, I read one of Spurgeon’s Morning and Evening devotionals. Not once have I been unmoved. This morning may mark the first time I have been scared that the great – my word not his – Baptist preacher had somehow found a way to hang out with me without me knowing it. I am including the whole devotional because the link to this one will go away after today. Feel free to post a response. His text is 1 Peter 5:10. I have included below I Peter 5:10-11 in the ESV, a more modern version than the one he was using. “And after you have suffered a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to his eternal glory in Christ, will himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you. To Him be the dominion forever and ever. Amen.” – I Peter 5:10-11You have seen the arch of heaven as it spans the plain: glorious are its colours, and rare its hues. It is beautiful, but, alas, it passes away, and lo, it is not. The fair colours give way to the fleecy clouds, and the sky is no longer brilliant with the tints of heaven. It is not established. How can it be? A glorious show made up of transitory sun-beams and passing rain-drops, how can it abide? The graces of the Christian character must not resemble the rainbow in its transitory beauty, but, on the contrary, must be stablished, settled, abiding. Seek, O believer, that every good thing you have may be an abiding thing. May your character not be a writing upon the sand, but an inscription upon the rock! May your faith be no “baseless fabric of a vision,” but may it be builded of material able to endure that awful fire which shall consume the wood, hay, and stubble of the hypocrite. May you be rooted and grounded in love. May your convictions be deep, your love real, your desires earnest. May your whole life be so settled and established, that all the blasts of hell, and all the storms of earth shall never be able to remove you. But notice how this blessing of being “stablished in the faith” is gained. The apostle’s words point us to suffering as the means employed—”After that ye have suffered awhile.” It is of no use to hope that we shall be well rooted if no rough winds pass over us. Those old gnarlings on the root of the oak tree, and those strange twistings of the branches, all tell of the many storms that have swept over it, and they are also indicators of the depth into which the roots have forced their way. So the Christian is made strong, and firmly rooted by all the trials and storms of life. Shrink not then from the tempestuous winds of trial, but take comfort, believing that by their rough discipline God is fulfilling this benediction to you.There’s really nothing left to say.

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Comments
  1. Jamie cain says:

    Way to jump in the pool again! Can’t go wrong with writing a few words in response to a great passage–whether it’s from a devotional, or from Scripture.

    Glad to have you back.

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